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Living with Ebola in West Africa


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1. A Doctors Without Borders (MSF), health worker in protective clothing carries a child suspected of having Ebola in the MSF treatment center on Oct. 5 in Paynesville, Liberia. The girl and her mother, showing symptoms of the deadly disease, were awaiting test results for the virus. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization.

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2. A woman prays for victims of the Ebola virus, on Oct. 4 in Saint Anthony’s Catholic church in the capital of Sierra Leone, Freetown. The Ebola epidemic has infected more than 6,200 people in West Africa since late last year and killed nearly half of them, according to the World Health Organization. (Florian Plaucheur/AFP/Getty Images)

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3. The shoes of a suspected Ebola patient are seen after being cordoned off with stones by local residents in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 24. U.S. health officials Tuesday laid out worst-case and best-case scenarios for the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, warning that the number of infected people could explode to at least 1.4 million by mid-January or peak well below that, if efforts to control the outbreak are ramped up. (Michael Duff/Associated Press)

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4. A grave digger prepares a new grave outside an Ebola treatment center on Oct. 7 near Gbarnga, in Bong County in central Liberia. The 70-bed facility is run by the U.S. based International Medical Corps and supported by USAID. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa, with nearly 2,000 of them in Liberia. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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5. A MSF nurse is prepared with personal protection equipment before entering a high risk zone of MSF’s Ebola isolation and treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Six months into the worlds worst-ever Ebola outbreak, and the first to happen in an unprepared West Africa, the gap between what has been sent by other countries and private groups and what is desperately needed is huge. Even as countries try to marshal more resources to close the gap, those needs threaten to become much greater, and possibly even insurmountable. (Jerome Delay/Associated Press)

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6. People wait to enter the ELWA 3 Doctors Without Borders Ebola treatment center on Oct. 3 in Paynesville, Liberia. Filled to capacity, the center can only take in as many new Ebola patients as the number of people who die overnight. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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7. A young girl suspected to be infected by Ebola has been moved to quarantine in a hospital, on Oct. 6 in Foredugu. Ebola may only be present in a few African nations, but fears over the crippling outbreak are infecting economies across the continent and may put its envy-inducing growth prospects at risk. (Florian Plaucheur/AFP/Getty Images)

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8. A Doctors Without Borders (MSF), staffer washes his hands in chlorinated water as sanitized boots dry at the MSF treatment center on Oct. 5 in Paynesville, Liberia. The epidemic has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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9. U.S. Navy microbiologist Lt. Jimmy Regeimbal prepares to test blood samples for Ebola at the U.S. Navy mobile laboratory of on Oct. 7 near Gbarnga in Bong County of central Liberia. The U.S. now operates 4 mobile laboratories in Liberia as part of the American response to the Ebola epidemic. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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10. People wash their hands with soap and bleach on Sept. 3 to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus on the usually busy main market road in the northern Senegalese city of Diaobe, one of the most important trading cities in West Africa. The busy market street is near empty since the Aug. 21 closure of the border with Guinea since a Guinean student brought the deadly Ebola epidemic raging across west Africa into Senegal. The Ebola virus, passed on through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed more than 2,000 in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Nigeria became the fourth country caught up in the epidemic, reporting seven deaths before Senegal registered its first case. (Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images)

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11. A health worker, center, loads a suspected Ebola patient into the back of a ambulance in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 24. U.S. health officials Tuesday laid out worst-case and best-case scenarios for the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, warning that the number of infected people could explode to at least 1.4 million by mid-January or peak well below that, if efforts to control the outbreak are ramped up. (Michael Duff/Associated Press)

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12. A health worker puts on protective gloves at an Ebola treatment center on Oct. 7 near Gbarnga in Bong County of central Liberia. The 70-bed facility is run by the U.S. based International Medical Corps and supported by USAID. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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13. A Liberian Ministry of Health worker, dressed in an anti-contamination suit, speaks to Banu, 4, in a holding center for suspected Ebola patients at Redemption Hospital on Oct. 3 in Monrovia, Liberia. He had arrived there with his sick mother and two siblings to be tested for Ebola. His father died of the disease a week before. Patients there are tested for Ebola and if the results are positive, are sent to an Ebola treatment unit (ETU). (John Moore/Getty Images)

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14. A member of a specialized Ebola inhumation team cleans a house on Oct. 6 in Magbonkoh. Ebola may only be present in a few African nations, but fears over the crippling outbreak are infecting economies across the continent and may put its envy-inducing growth prospects at risk. (Florian Plaucheur/AFP/Getty Images)

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15. A man sits in an empty street in downtown Freetown as a nationwide three-day curfew begins in order to conduct a governmental, UN-supported house-to-house campaign sensitizing individuals on the Ebola virus, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Sept. 19. Residents in the country of 6 million will stay in their homes from Friday to Monday as over 28,000 health workers distribute soap, raise awareness on Ebola and identify those who may have already contracted the virus. The three-day shutdown is the latest in the government’s effort to stop the spread of the deadly disease. (Tanya Bindry/EPA)

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16. Health workers enter the high-risk zone as they make the morning rounds at the Bong County Ebola Treatment Unit in Sgt. Kollie Town near Gbarnga, Liberia, on Oct. 6. In the newly opened treatment center, operated by an American charity, the International Medical Corps. Western volunteers and Liberian workers identify who is infected, save those they can and try to halt the virus’s spread. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)

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17. Workers of a cleaning company collect garbage in central Monrovia on Sept. 30. Liberia has been hit the hardest by the worst ever outbreak of Ebola, which has killed more than 3,400 people in west Africa. (Pascal Guyot/AFP/Getty Images)

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18. Prince, 10, lies with his family in an Ebola holding center, formerly the maternity ward of Redemption Hospital on Oct. 3 in Monrovia, Liberia. His father died of Ebola a week before. People at the center are tested for Ebola and if the results are positive, are sent to an Ebola treatment unit (ETU). (John Moore/Getty Images)

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19. Bystanders listen to a street preacher on Sept. 27 calling on people to raise their hands and “Wave Ebola Bye Bye” in Monrovia, Liberia. (Jerome Delay/Associated Press)

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20. A Liberian Ministry of Health worker is sprayed with disinfectant after removing his anti-contamination suit at a holding center for suspected Ebola patients at Redemption Hospital on Oct. 3 in Monrovia, Liberia. Patients there are tested for Ebola and if the results are positive, are sent to an Ebola treatment unit (ETU). (John Moore/Getty Images)

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21. A burial team buries the body of Robert Yini, who died from Ebola, at a graveyard adjacent to the Bong County Ebola Treatment Unit near Gbarnga in rural Bong County, Liberia, on Oct. 6. The center, which includes a triage area, a restricted unit for patients suspected of Ebola infections and another for those in the grip of the disease is not teeming like some clinics in Monrovia, more than four hours away. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)

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22. Dennis Khakie, who initially tested positive for Ebola, celebrates as he walked out of the confirmed ward after receiving a negative laboratory testing for the virus at the Bong County Ebola Treatment Unit near Gbarnga in rural Bong County, Liberia, on Oct. 4. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)

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23. A woman enters the Ebola treatment center at the Island Hospital on Oct. 6 on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia. She said she was bleeding heavily from a miscarriage and was unable to get treatment at other clinics, many of which now refuse to treat bleeding patients due to fears of contracting Ebola. The Island Hospital, with it’s 120 beds, has remained at full capacity since it’s opening by the Liberian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), in September. The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa, according to the WHO. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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24. A soiled surgical mask lies outside the Ebola treatment center at the Island Hospital on Oct. 6, on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia. (John Moore/Getty Images)

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25. Relatives pray over a weak Siata Johnson, 23, outside the Ebola treatment center at the Island Hospital on Oct. 6 on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia. The hospital, with it’s 120 beds, has remained at capacity since it’s opening by the Liberian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), in September. The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa, according to the WHO. (John Moore/Getty Images)

From: http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2014/10/08/living-with-ebola-west-africa/vTCGB1bQTSbQitjUkSsTWI/story.html?p1=BP_Headline

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