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Affordable housing crisis in Brazil


Affordable housing in Rio de Janeiro is in high demand for the city of twelve million. The city is dealing with a housing crisis daily, with about 220,000 people without a proper place to live. With the Olympics coming in 2016, real estate has become too expensive for many. Recently, several hundred squatters were evicted from a housing complex and forced to live back in the slums.–By Leanne Burden Seidel
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1. A boy walks on a dirt road of the Terra Prometida, or Promised Land shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Nov. 14. An estimated 220,000 Rio de Janeiro residents are trapped by the city’s chronic housing deficit. There are simply not enough affordable houses to meet demand in this city of 12 million (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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2. A woman watches television inside her makeshift home at the Nova Tuffy slum in an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro, Oct. 17. Since seven months ago, 1,800 families have been living inside the factory, which they occupied in March, with poor sanitation services and the fear of eviction. The occupants of the factory say they are not included in the housing program “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (My House, My Life), and they would like to be included by the Brazilian government. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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3. A squatter leaves, carrying a child and a toy bike as a police officer stands guard during an eviction of a public housing complex, in Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 19. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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4. An elderly woman walks at a slum in front of the newly built apartments of the “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (My House, My Life) housing program in Rio de Janeiro Nov.14. Authorities have ordered the eviction of about 200 squatters from nearby slums, who moved into the apartments last weekend, according to local media. (Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)

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5. Squatter Taina Ferreira, 25, sweeps the floor of a room in a low-income housing project that went up nearby the Terra Prometida, or Promised Land, slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Ferreira and her neighbors saw the low-income housing project in the adjacent lot was empty, so they decided to take it over. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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6. A squatter lays her hands in prayer over the entrance gate of a newly built low-income housing project in Rio de Janeiro. Mayor Eduardo Paes insisted the squatters had to go through the proper channels to receive public housing and he ordered the group to leave. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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7. Taina Ferreira, 25, right center, gets help transporting her stove back to her dirt floor home after she was evicted from a public-housing apartment, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “Now, we are going back to live like animals,” Ferreira said. (Leo Correa)

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8. Taina Ferreira, 25, recounts her living conditions at the Terra Prometida, or Promised Land, slum in Rio de Janeiro. Ferreira said that when it rains, the dirt floor of the home where she lives with her three small children turns to mud, and the contents of the open sewer that cuts in front of her front door sweep into the house. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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9. A single bulb illuminates Ana Manhaes’ living room in the Terra Prometida, or Promised Land shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An estimated 220,000 Rio de Janeiro residents are trapped by the city’s chronic housing deficit. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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10. Police officers take position in an operation against gangs near the eviction of a public housing complex, in Rio de Janeiro, Nov. 19. Several hundred people invaded the complex earlier this month, apparently with the help of a few heavily armed gang members. Other low-income families had been chosen to receive the housing units and were slated to move in in December. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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11. A squatter carries his belongings back into the Terra Prometida, or Promised Land, slum, after voluntarily leaving the multistory housing project, pictured in background, he and several hundred families had occupied, in Rio de Janeiro. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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12. Squatters stand with their belongings after they were evicted from a low-income housing project, in Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 19. After 10 days in the project, the squatters lugged their possession back to a nearby slum after being ordered to leave. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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13. Two women talk outside their makeshift homes, part of the Nova Tuffy slum, in an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. Since seven months ago, 1,800 families have been living inside the factory, which they occupied in March, with poor sanitation services and the fear of eviction. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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14. A man looks out to the Nova Tuffy slum factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. The occupants say they are not included in the housing program “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (My House, My Life), and they would like to be included by the Brazilian government. The housing program is one of several government initiatives aimed at reducing poverty and social inequality that President Dilma Rousseff has held up as achievements of her administration as she campaigns for re-election. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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15. Squatters gather to pray during a protest demanding proper housing, in front of a housing project they occupied, in Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 15. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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16. Raissa Ferreira, 8, helps her mother to carry materials to set up a makeshift shack after Homeless Workers Movement (MTST) members invaded an abondoned land in Sao Goncalo, surburb of Rio de Janeiro on Nov. 4. The MTST confirmed that nearly 450 families have already arrived to the land –which covers more than 60,000 square meters and has been abondoned for many decades. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)

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17. A man sleeps on a sofa next to a shack that was built by members of the Homeless Workers Movement, on an empty lot they occupied in the impoverished suburb of Sao Goncalo, Rio de Janeiro, on Nov. 12. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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18. A man sets up a shack after Homeless Workers Movement (MTST) members invaded an abondoned land in Sao Goncalo, surburb of Rio de Janeiro, Nov. 4. The MTST say that they will negotiate with the government to include the land in the goverment’s social housing program. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)

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19. Squatters protest outside the newly built apartments of the “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (My House, My Life) housing program in Rio de Janeiro Nov. 19. The apartments of the housing program, meant for the poor, have already been allocated to families by raffle. (Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)

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20. Five-year-old Jeferson poses for a photo with his drawing of a tree, on an empty lot occupied by several families, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Nov. 12. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)

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21. A woman holding her baby smokes a cigarette as she waits for a washing machine, before doing laundry inside the bathroom at the Nova Tuffy slum, in an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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22. A man builds a makeshift housing in an abandoned area in Sao Goncalo city, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, Nov. 5. About 500 families members of Brazilian movement ‘Workers Without Ceiling’ took over an abandoned area to live in five days ago. (Antonio Lacerda/EPA)

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23. A woman pours water on children to refresh them at the Nova Tuffy slum at an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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24. A girl sits outside an apartment of the newly built “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (My House, My Life) housing program in Rio de Janeiro Nov. 14. (Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)

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25. A pool among makeshift homes, part of the Nova Tuffy slum, is pictured in an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

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26. A babysitter stands at the entrance of a makeshift home, part of the Nova Tuffy slum, in an abandoned factory in Rio de Janeiro Oct. 17. (Pilar Olivares/Reuters)

From: http://www.bostonglobe.com/

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